Symbolic and Mythological Animals

Symbolic and Mythological Animals

Symbolic and Mythological Animals

This A-Z of symbolic and mythological animals concentrates specifically on the stories associated with birds and beasts from around the world. Entries vary in length depending on the importance of the animal, fowl, insect or fish, with practically every creature having some symbolic or mythological significance. In addition the book examines the fabulous monsters of legend, and there are more general entries such as totems, fetishes, animal guardians and animal worship. The guide concludes with a bibliography.

Animal symbolism and mythology Book II

Animal symbolism and mythology  Book II

Animal symbolism and mythology Book II

"The hog, as well as the wild boar, is another disguise of the solar hero in the night-another of the forms very often assumed by the sun, as a mythical hero, in the darkness or clouds. He adopts this form in order sometimes to hide himself from his persecutors, sometimes to exterminate them, and sometimes on account of a divine or demoniacal malediction. This form is sometimes a dark and demoniacal guise assumed by the hero; on which account the poem of Hyndla, in the Edda calls the hog a hero's animal. Often, however, it represents the demon himself. When the solar hero enters the domain of evening, the form he had of a handsome youth or splendid prince disappears; but he himself, as a general rule, does not die along with it; he only passes into another, an uglier, and a monstrous form. The black bull, the black horse, the grey horse, the hump-backed horse, the ass, and the goat, are all forms of the same disguise with which we are already acquainted. The thousand-bellied Indras, who has lost his testicles; Argunas, who disguises himself as a eunuch; Indras, Vishnus, Zeus, Achilleus, Odin, Thor, Helgi, and many other mythical heroes, who disguise themselves as women; and the numerous beautiful heroines who, in mythology and tradition, disguise themselves as bearded men, are all ancient forms under which was represented the passage of either the sun or the aurora of evening into the darkness, cloud, ocean, forest, grotto, or hell of night. "

Animal symbolism and mythology

Animal symbolism and mythology

Animal symbolism and mythology

We are on the vast table-land of Central Asia; gigantic mountains send forth on every side their thousand rivers; immense pasture-lands and forests cover it; migratory tribes of pastoral nations traverse it; the gopatis, the shepherd or lord of the cows, is the king; the gopatis who has most herds is the most powerful. The story begins with a graceful pastoral idyll. To increase the number of the cows, to render them fruitful in milk and prolific in calves, to have them well looked after, is the dream, the ideal of the ancient Aryan. The bull, the foecundator, is the type of every male perfection, and the symbol of regal strength. Hence, it is only natural that the two most prominent animal figures in the mythical heaven should be the cow and the bull. The cow is the ready, loving, faithful, fruitful Providence of the shepherd. The worst enemy of the Aryan, therefore, is he who carries off the cow; the best, the most illustrious, of his friends, he who is able to recover it from the hands of the robber. The same idea is hence transferred to heaven; in heaven there is a beneficent, fruitful power, which is called the cow, and a beneficent foecundator of this same power, which is called the bull. The dewy moon, the dewy aurora, the watery cloud, the entire vault of heaven, that giver of the quickening and benignant rain, that benefactress of mankind,-are each, with special predilection, represented as the beneficent cow of abundance. The lord of this multiform cow of heaven, he who makes it pregnant and fruitful and milk-yielding, the spring or morning sun, the rain-giving sun (or moon) is often represented as a bull...

Dictionary of Symbolic and Mythological Animals

Dictionary of Symbolic and Mythological Animals

Dictionary of Symbolic and Mythological Animals

This dictionary offers an enlightening account of the role that animals real and fantastical have played in shaping the myths, religion and customs of the world, from primordial times to present day.

Animal Life In Nature Myth and Dreams

Animal Life In Nature  Myth and Dreams

Animal Life In Nature Myth and Dreams

In Animal Life in Nature, Myth and Dreams, Elizabeth Caspari connects the world of real, living animals with the symbolic world of animal images in human thought, both conscious and unconscious. She gives the reader an opportunity to make this connection on his or her own personal journey of discovery. This book is a study of animals-their natural history, mythology, folklore, and religious significance around the world as well as their role in our lives, dreams, and everyday language. It examines the symbolic impact animals have on our collective culture, particularly on our own personal and interior lives. From Albatross to Zebra, each animal is pictured in color and factual context is given about its behavior in the natural world. Information is included about habitat, distribution, weight, size, longevity, and classification. By drawing on a process of amplification developed by C.G. Jung, in which an image is related to a previous historical, mythological, religious, or ethnological context, Animal Life in Nature, Myth and Dreams discusses the meaning of the animal in a dream, amplifying the reader's understanding of that animal. Intended for anyone interested in the actual behavior and nature of animals and the world we live in, Animal Life presents a good deal of ethological and mythological material. By contemplating the significance of our fellow creatures, and how everything in our universe is connected, Animal Life offers a more whole, and more healing, view of the world. Fully illustrated in color.

Animal Symbolism and Mythology

Animal Symbolism and Mythology

Animal Symbolism and Mythology

The myth of the dog is one of those of which the interpretation is more delicate. As the common dog stays upon the doorstep of the house, so is the mythical dog generally found at the gate of the sky, morning and evening, in connection with the two Açvinâu. It was a fugitive phenomenon of but an instant's duration which determined the formation of the principal myth of the dog. When this moment is past, the myth changes its nature. I have already referred to the French expression, "entre chien et loup," as used to denote the twilight;[29] the dog precedes by one instant the evening twilight, and follows by one instant that of morning: it is, in a word, the twilight at its most luminous moment. Inasmuch as it watches at the gates of night, it is usually a funereal, infernal, and formidable animal; inasmuch as it guards the gates of day, it is generally represented as a propitious one; and as we have seen that, of the two Açvinâu, one is in especial relation with the moon, and the other with the sun, so, of the two dogs of mythology, one is especially lunar, and the other especially solar. Between these two dogs we find the bitch their mother, who, if I am not mistaken, represents now the wandering moon of heaven, the guiding moon that illumines the path of the hero and heroine, now the thunderbolt that tears the cloud, and opens up the hiding-place of the cows or waters. We have, therefore, thus far three mythical dogs. One; menacing, is found by the solar hero in the evening at the western gates of heaven; the second, the more active, helps him in the forest of night, where he is hunting, guides him in danger, and shows him the lurking-places of his enemies whilst he is in the cloud or darkness; the third, in the morning, is quiet, and found by the hero when he comes out of the gloomy region, towards the eastern sky.

Animal Symbolism and Mythology

Animal Symbolism and Mythology

Animal Symbolism and Mythology

We are on the vast table-land of Central Asia; gigantic mountains send forth on every side their thousand rivers; immense pasture-lands and forests cover it; migratory tribes of pastoral nations traverse it; the gopatis, the shepherd or lord of the cows, is the king; the gopatis who has most herds is the most powerful. The story begins with a graceful pastoral idyll. To increase the number of the cows, to render them fruitful in milk and prolific in calves, to have them well looked after, is the dream, the ideal of the ancient Aryan. The bull, the f cundator, is the type of every male perfection, and the symbol of regal strength. Hence, it is only natural that the two most prominent animal figures in the mythical heaven should be the cow and the bull. The cow is the ready, loving, faithful, fruitful Providence of the shepherd. The worst enemy of the Aryan, therefore, is he who carries off the cow; the best, the most illustrious, of his friends, he who is able to recover it from the hands of the robber. The same idea is hence transferred to heaven; in heaven there is a beneficent, fruitful power, which is called the cow, and a beneficent f cundator of this same power, which is called the bull. The dewy moon, the dewy aurora, the watery cloud, the entire vault of heaven, that giver of the quickening and benignant rain, that benefactress of mankind, -are each, with special predilection, represented as the beneficent cow of abundance. The lord of this multiform cow of heaven, he who makes it pregnant and fruitful and milk-yielding, the spring or morning sun, the rain-giving sun (or moon) is often represented as a bull..."

Animal Symbolism in Celtic Mythology

Animal Symbolism in Celtic Mythology

Animal Symbolism in Celtic Mythology

"Animal Symbolism in Celtic Mythology" is a paper written by Lars Nooden on November 22, 1992. The paper highlights some of the uses of animals as representations of objects and ideas in Celtic mythology. Animals are related with fertility and vitality and specific animals have associations depending on their characteristics. The most frequently used animal symbols are of the boar, fish, serpent, bird, and herd animals.

Animals and Animal Symbols in World Culture

Animals and Animal Symbols in World Culture

Animals and Animal Symbols in World Culture

A comprehensive guide to the history of human interaction with the creatures of the earth, air, and water. This book provides historical perspective on mankind's complicated relationship with all creatures, from tiny insects to larger beasts. From the alligator to the wryneck, key animals from every continent are profiled, with articles focusing on how different cultures viewed the creatures with which they shared land, and the ones they considered omens of gods and devils. In addition to the numerous articles on specific animals, there are also entries on the role of animals in Christian art, and how shamans took the form and power of animals in key ceremonies. The work is highly illustrated, and subjects of major interest are provided with individual bibliographies of further reading on the subject at the end of each article.